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administration to create the electric vehicle infrastructure for the city and began the conversation and the collaboration with the other counties to bring an electric vehicle corridor. it signals our efforts to support the creation of infrastructure to the electric vehicle industry. of course we have encouraged the private automobile creators to join us. today is a wonderful opportunity to do that with a bmw. any of you who noticed the labels in this city, you will certainly noticed the popularity of bmw as a corporation, not only a great company but one that is also on the cutting edge of the use of technology. i want to thank them and welcome them to not only the electric vehicle stage, which they have been working on, but also to this great program they are about to introduce, the drive now and park now technology. joined -- joining us in the car sharing program for their members who want to use bmw products. this idea of cars sharing has been a part of san francisco's objective in creating a more sharing economy. like many other cities, we are congested in our parking. parking i
. [applause] >> thank you and welcome everybody to today's announcement of my appointment to the city college board of trustees for san francisco. let me begin by thanking my good friend, someone who graduated from my alma mater, somebody who worked with for many years, he has been part of the elected city family for the city college for over a decade. of course, that is mr. marks. you want to give our condolences and certainly acknowledge milton's contribution to our college, not only to his family, community, to the environment that he terrorist so much, but also to the institution of our city college that he worked so hard to improve. he took up the mantle, especially in the hard times when it was challenging already. i had a chance to express that to abby last week and let her know that we were thinking about >> thank you and welcome everybody to today's announcement of my appointment to the city college board of trustees for san francisco. let me begin by thanking my good him, certainly, were blessed with the many years of service that he and the family provided. his contributions to our
. city college of san francisco has 9 campuses in the city and serves approximately 100,000 students each year. the state has reduced funding to ccsf by core academic courses, provide work force training, provide an education that prepares students for 4 year universities, keep city college libraries and student support services open, keep technology and instructional support up to date, and offset state budget cuts. i'm here with alyssa messer, an english teacher at city college of san francisco. she's the ppt of aft2121, the faculty union, and a proponent of proposition a. also joining us is starchild, a local activist with the libertarian party of san francisco and a former candidate for the san francisco school board. he's an opponent of the measure. thank you both for taking the time to be with us today. >> thank you. >> alyssa, i'd like to give you the opportunity it share the thoughts of your position. >> so proposition a is a temporary 8-year, $79 parcel tax on properties in san francisco. and that money would go directly to supporting city college of san francisco. city colleg
proud of this kind of public-private partnership to move the city forward. now join me in welcoming the city's first asian american mayor and i'm very proud to say a member of the lee tribe, the 43rd mayor of san francisco, ed lee. (applause). >> thank you, judy, very much for that introduction. good morning, everyone. >> good morning. >> it's great to be here at the san francisco chamber and of course the center for economic development here, your breakfast for 2012, it's my pleasure to be here. i walked in as ed from wells fargo was talking and i just wanted to make sure you knew, i am eternally grateful it the chamber, to wells fargo for helping me create 5,200 jobs for our kids. that's a wonderful accomplishment. i've been your mayor for almost two years now and everybody is coming up to me and asking, are you enjoying it? you know, some of the politics in the city it's hard to enjoy but i will say honestly to steve fox, to the chamber and judy and all of you working together to keep our city successful, i do enjoy creating jobs. and when you see our youth get those paid in
of our sister city committee which has many exchanges which we're going hear about more of them today, mayor lee, you have been mayor for almost two years, and as you know, the mayor of paris has been mayor for 11 years, and look how young he is, so there's hope for you. we have just had a meeting inside and the mate -- mayor has made a promise which tom and i and matthew, we're going to make sure he keeps that promise and he says, next year, we're going to paris, so tom horn and i are going to be the advanced team, we're leaving with the mayor on a sunday when he goes back. so, may i introduce our mayor, a newer mayor than the mayor of paris but one we are proud of and we will be hoping that he is planning the trip very soon, so may i present mayor lee. [applause]. >> thank you, charlotte. >> well, thank you, everybody, for coming here today. as you can see, there was excitement in the air when the mayor of paris comes to san francisco and i want to welcome him, i want to welcome the council general office as well, this is an exciting moment for me, waiting 6 years since his last vi
visit is too long, not to renew a friendship to this city which has been historic friendship and one of the most dynamic sister city relationships that we have, i noticed in our room we have other numbers of our other sister cities, manila and gosh, there's so many, cork, and other regions that also -- and our other council generals that are here today, thank you so much for coming and frn council blats for enjoying this moment, there is a lot to be gained by our sister city and especially with paris, i was informing the mayor of my first trip to paris, it's been my only trip which is why i have to go officially, but that was 1969 was my very first trip to pear ris as a high school student, as a high school choir of high school in seattle, we raised money all yearlong for us to go, i got to visit the jazz club along the river and then i got to hear for the very first time stevie wonder saying my shari amor in paris, look it up, that's why of course mayor dell way has invited me to be making my first official visit some time next year and certainly charlotte and tom and others have ju
and if i can satisfy them and they stay in the city, the tech companis will stay in the city. >> any other points that you want to talk about? >> sf city is our citizens initiative for technology and innovation. that is what i call the technology chamber of commerce and we have over 300 companies now that are members. they are helping us figure out how to make sure that the companies are here, comfortably, but also how we train the new workforce to continue this fantastic growth in employment with the technology companies. >> and these companies are paying? >> oh, yes. >> who are the most helpful companies that you have found here? >> oh, gosh, there are so many of them. i was, for example, jawbone is one of the members and they stepped up along with all the members, all the major members of city this summer to help me create over 5,000 jobs for kids. >> child labor? >> no, summer-pay internships. >> not like 6 years old building iphones. >> these were high school and college graduates, but they are all looking for jobs and they want to be exposed to this wonderful world of techno
know, some of the politics in the city it's hard to enjoy but i will say honestly to steve fox, to the chamber and judy and all of you working together to keep our city successful, i do enjoy creating jobs. and when you see our youth get those paid internships or get that summer job at a number of all of your or starbucks, even, or the jamba juice and all the others and the nonprofits as well as our city departments and you see the gleam in their eye that they can really be part of this community in san francisco, that's something i really do enjoy and i will continue enjoying that for this whole 4 years term, even though i will avoid all the politics as much as i can. but i want to begin by saying that since i started, as judy mentioned earlier, san francisco businesses have created 22,500 jobs as my start, including 13,000 new jobs in technology and industry alone. unemployment dropped from 9.6 when i started to 7.4 percent, third lowest in the state, and i said in other jurisdictions, i'll say it again, i think we contribute to marin and san mateo because we buy all the wi
chairman of our sister city committee which has many exchanges which we're going hear about more of them today, mayor lee, you have been mayor for almost two years, and as you know, the mayor of paris has been mayor for 11 years, and look how young he is, so there's hope for you. we have just had a meeting inside and the mate -- mayor has made a promise which tom and i and matthew, we're going to make sure he keeps that promise and he says, next year, we're going to paris, so tom horn and i are going to be the advanced team, we're leaving with the mayor on a sunday when he goes back. so, may i introduce our mayor, a newer mayor than the mayor of paris but one we are proud of and we will be hoping that he is planning the trip very soon, so may i present mayor lee. [applause]. >> thank you, charlotte. >> well, thank you, everybody, for coming here today. as you can see, there was excitement in the air when the mayor of paris comes to san francisco and i want to welcome him, i want to welcome the council general office as well, this is an exciting moment for me, waiting 6 years since his l
whose ceo, a member of the city sister committee is with us today. there are many other examples of successful and flourishing business and commercial relations between our two cities, an atmosphere made part in possible due to the close working relationship between our two close municipalities. finally, as each of the mayors before me, i must comment on the world of art and culture of which san francisco and paris are two world capitals. our cultural exchanges are often, live the highest quality. many san francisco cultural institutions of every size perform frequently in paris. san francisco's symphony presents every year in paris and the new president of their board of directors is here today, so also deshanty clear, a smaller men's choral group, a member of our committee is here today as well. and parisian artists are often in san francisco in the region and they're always warmly welcomed. at this very moment as the mayor said earl ye, we are pleased to welcome to the bay area e man yell, director of st vil de la paris who will be presenting tomorrow the and the next niekt th
a second home in a fancy condo buildings in this city. you can have an extra count that you want to rent out, and you can find access to travelers from all over the world who also do not have the resources to spend money on a $200 hotel bill who want to say on your couch, and that is really democratizing travel, not just access to travel, but also access to the tourism economy that flourishes in the city. >> i just want to address the technology point really quickly. we try and emphasize the human aspect of this, whether it is on the website or whether it is through the iphone app. other people use a device that we built, that lets you share a car more conveniently by letting the richer unlock the car with their smartphone. even with that, we really try to connect the people who are sharing because a lot of people to accept rentals just with the kit and may never meet the people they are sharing with. we tried to encourage the parties to get to know each other, trying to just display your interest or so many things i can think of that our websites due to show who this person really is. t
lee is working hard to make this city an even better place to start and grow a new business, and second, he's been a toothless support of electric vehicles to improve san francisco's environment and the global environment as a whole so please welcome mayor ed lee. >> michael, matt, congratulations to scoot, yes. scoot and san francisco, well, let me first of all put this in some little perspective that i know, i know that we just announced last week, eb week in san francisco to the delight of so many people who want to just have modes of transportation, multiple modes of transportation in a city that are also environmentally friendly and to contribute that reducing our fossil fuels, we are in san francisco world citizens after all and i know it's exciting for ed risken, our mta manager, he and i were excited to talk about different modes of transportation as we create all these exciting events to come to san francisco. i know it's exciting for board president david chiu, we tried to put pods for car sharing in neighborhoods on public streets and began in russian hill on his
pleasure to welcome such an amazing panel as well as the mayor of our fine city. this is the innovation mayor, mayor ed lee. [applause] >> thank you. can everyone here me? welcome to spur. i enjoy being here because every time i come here, some part of my brain wakes up that has not been woken up before. i am here to welcome you. earlier, i had a wonderful opportunity to exchange with our panel members about what they are doing and how they're doing it. . i think these panel members are here as part of their own entrepreneurial spirit. they own companies but love the city. they know the spirit of the city is one of innovation, that invites peoples and views, and smashes them -- meshes them together to see if we can make an even better san francisco. we have two other supervisors who may be coming later. we're all part of the initial group of policymakers at city hall who want to hear news views and ideas on the new collaborative economy. we're interested in it because it has aspects that have piqued our interest, about hoour environment, how to improve life for more people, how to make
at it, we're putting in place an awful lot of things that shape what our city looks like in the future, how our city operates, how we interact with our city. as i started to think about that, i thought, you know, the number of major infrastructure projects going on in our immediate region now are probably -- there are probably more dollars and energy going into that than any time since bart was put through the city. you have the eastern span of the bay bridge. you have the transbay terminal. you have the central subway project. you have the improvement realignment of doyle drive. all of these things are part of the hard wiring of our city that is going to influence the way in which we all interact with it. over the last, say, five to ten years, we have watched as development and interest and people have moved south of market, into mission bay, below that we now that is continuing and we now have projects on the table like the pier 70 project, which ten years ago no one would have thought was a viable mixed-use project, because nobody went there. and that part of it is no longer true.
work that happens in the city and also to honor the individuals who are responsible for some of that success. congratulations to all of our honorees. we're very grateful for your work. let's give a hand for them. [applause] the good government awards also support spur's good government work. it is a central part of our mission. our agenda is admittedly ambitious. we analyze every local measure on the san francisco ballot, which until recently was a pretty formidable task. we participate in most of the major issues of city government from pension and payroll tax reform to some of the most important discussions on how we fund a lot of our public services, whether that finding different revenue streams for our parks, are trying to find new ways to fund public transportation in the city. we're very happy to be working with mayor lee and the board to address a lot of these issues. this will clearly be a busy year for us. another component of our work is connecting the city's robuspro o assistance with our many business partners. this is a core part of mfac original purpose in san
. scoot isn't just a better way to get around the city, when we started scoot, we believed that giving people an alternative to driving could have huge benefits for the local and global environment, we're dieted that mel knee muter, the director of the san francisco department of the environment is here with us in our opening of public beta in san francisco. >> good morning, everyone, it is an honor to be here for scoot's public announcement. this really does have great promise for helping to reduce carbon emissions in the city and county of san francisco. as some of you may know, about 40% of our carbon emissions in the city come from cars and trucks so we need to find alternatives for getting people out of their fossil fuel powered cars, this is going to be a great option for residences and businesses in san francisco to find an al -- an tern t*if, we're rolling out the electric vehicle infrastructure for cars so this is another electric vehicle option that we're happy to support. we also implement the commuter benefits program and help employers provide options to their employees f
, no budget, which i am really proud of. come join my team. i am bootstrapping things. cities are the original sharing platform. we manage parking through parking meters. we manage books through public libraries. we manage our natural resources through parks. cities have played this role. in this bidding we're having this conversation in san francisco at -- it is negative beating -- it is fitting that we're having this conversation in san francisco at spur. i think it is off somewhere one of the first cities, i think the only city, and has put together a working group around the sharing economy. we are the epicenter in san francisco. we have a role to help nurture the emerging space. there is a lot of value to be created here. i am really excited to be part of the panel seeing all of these great people next to me. >> the people on the panel are going to tell us about their companies. let's come straight down the line. >> i am a co-founder and ceo of viable, a community marketplace for travel experiences. anybody can offer their services to others as a guide, offering touristrs, sailing ships,
levels. and it's been a collaborative effort in the city as well. i want to next introduce mohammed nuru director of public works who was instrumental in helping us launch this project. (applause) >> thank you. i'll keep it brief. i just want to say thank you to the department of public health for being a great partner with dpw. we've had a good opportunity to be able to renovate many of our health centers. we are building the new hospital and today this very, very great project. the project from dpw, we provided architectural design. we provided engineering and construction management. and i'd like to thank the team that worked on the project real quick, the project's architect, lamont and banito, please give them a hand. (applause) >> from the engineering james ing and ray louie, give them a hand. (applause) >> and for construction administration jose gordato. (applause) >> and, of course, from the public health side, mark primo from dpw, [speaker not understood] who both led these projects. a little quick note about the project itself, the building is over 100 years old. and while all
technology company, they've got investor confidence in our city. we're also creating investor confidence because we have in working closely with our controller and all the other financial organizations of our city and all of our departments, we're now on a more financially stable responsible path. we've done our pension reform, it's not 100 percent, we've gt a big chunk of it down and we're going to continue doing the smart things to make sure that pension is solid. and we've got structural reforms in our budget as well. we passed our first two-year budget. that's a wonderful accomplishment, one that i'm interested in to continue it make sure we plan for the long-term. and we're not going to rest on today's success. this is just a beginning and you know this is just my first year, 4 years, and i'm going gang busters on our financial economy, stablization and financial ideas because that's what we have to do first, is have a good economic foundation in which to grow. for the first time in years you've seen a lot of unity move around this city between business and labor, between the l
cities are strong, now with this new agreement, we assure they will continue and remain strong nd beneficial for the great cities of paris and san francisco. [applause]. >> do you think he interpreted himself well? so, you can see why he is our chairman, now the moment has come, mayors, to sign the memorandum of understanding. yes, sign it. [applause]. (next event). >> i tried to think about this room as the dream room, where we dream and bring some of those dreams to life. i feel very blessed that i have been able to spend the last 31 years of my life doing it my way, thinking about things better interesting to me, and then pursuing them. there are a lot of different artists that come here to work, mostly doing aerial work. kindred spirits, so to speak. there is a circus company that i have been fortunate enough to work with the last couple of years. i use elements of dance and choreography and combine that with theater techniques. a lot of the work is content- based, has a strong narrative. the dancers have more of a theatrical feel. i think we are best known for our specific wo
thoughts on the city's economic development? are we on the right track? what would you like to change about the city's approach to developing economies? >> in the chair of the land use committee this year, and i was vice chair last year with our former chair from the bayview hunters point area. i guess i approach land use and economic development from a different perspective. i'm not against development, but i want it to be equitable so we look at the lowest income populations or even middle income populations so that residents have a strong say as development moves forward, whether it is the park ridge said development in the southern, western part of the city or even treasure island with there's many low-income families that currently live there. but it is a strong voice for the residents that currently are there. we also want to see new people moving into the city, and hopefully, we focus also on families and housing that provides better homes and home opportunities for families, but i always say that i support equitable development. i also do feel that big business and downtown interest
>>thanks renel. tony's recording is a huge part of not just the city tradition but the san francisco giants tradition. since we have been in the new ball park, it has been played a total of 573 times after giants wins, including playoff wins and including world series wins. [applause] importantly, you know, we almost lost the giants. in 1993, we made some desperate calls to tony when the team was saved, and we asked tony -- there is only one person that could kick off the new generation, the new era of giants baseball on opening day in 1993, and that was tony bennett. he sang "god bless america" and "i left my heart in san francisco" on that date. it was an unbelievable day. it brought down the house, as did your performance at the all- star game. as did your performance at the world series. you are a huge part of the san francisco giants. as we all know, you have not arrived until you have your own bobblehead. [laughter] last year, we created a created abobblehea -- a tony bennett bobblehead for tony bennett night. it has a voice chip, and when you push the head, it sings
for this weekend. but i want to not only congratulate unico for locating here in our very exciting part of our city, the international part where so many millions of visitors come every year. in fact, last year in 2011, over 16.3 million visitors came to san francisco and most of them found their way to unit square to the best shopping in the world. this is the center for arts and culture and of course it is our innovation capitol of the world and we are doing all of the right things to continue our success in the city. part of that success, is to work with great corporate citizens like unico and their efforts to make sure that they give their best effort to hire san franciscoans. today we celebrate not just a flag ship store but a store that has made corporate responsibility at the helm of their friend. there is over 500 people that they have already hired in this store. that is a fabulous contribution. they have worked that magic with our office of economic development, having spent weeks to train people who may not have gotten this opportunity. but for their out reach in this store, and then, th
that the recovery and the economic prosperity reaches every neighborhood in our city. technology is not only bringing jobs to san francisco, but it's bringing new solutions to our government. we're embracing the use of technology and to enhance our performance, to measure our performances, to increase transparency and communications with our constituents and to transform our relationships with business and residents. many of you in this room already know how hard it is and how difficult it is to start a business in our city. business owners have to navigate through multiple city departments, state and federal regulations, so now we're deploying technology to streamline this process. we're going to make it easier with a one stop shop to make sure our san francisco businesses can start here, stay here and grow here. innovation is at the forefront. let me mention a special area of innovation that's going on, what i call the silent giant in san francisco. you'll have in front of you this study. it is entitled from our council the world-leading center for health care and research that's pro
and resilience every day. i wanted to take a moment to detail how san francisco is a sustainable seven -- city. being a sustainable city means we are less wasteful. we are leading the nation with over 78% diversion rate. 70% of our waste is recycled, compost, or diverted. being a sustainable city, we are energy-efficient. our energy program is a partnership that we have put together with pg&e and we help small businesses save money on energy bills and reduce carbon emissions. in san francisco, we are also renewable the powered. we have about 3000 solar installations throughout the city and county of san francisco, equalling 19 megawatts of solar. we are also working toward being 100% powered city in the next 10 years. finally, in san francisco, it means we are ev ready. we're making it easier for residents to take charge of their electric cars. the city now operates 50 publicly available charging stations at 15 locations. these are found at city parking garages, at the airport, treasure island, and by the end of 2012, the city will add another 30-40 charges. of note, the public uses the statio
important to scoot, the first is that mayor lee is working hard to make this city an even better place to start and grow a new business, and second, he's been a toothless support of electric vehicles to improve san francisco's environment and the global environment as a whole so please welcome mayor ed lee. >> michael, matt, congratulations to scoot, yes. scoot and san francisco, well, let me first of all put this in some little perspective that i know, i know that we just announced last week, eb week in san francisco to the delight of so many people who want to just have modes of transportation, multiple modes of transportation in a city that are also environmentally friendly and to contribute that reducing our fossil fuels, we are in san francisco world citizens after all and i know it's exciting for ed risken, our mta manager, he and i were excited to talk about different modes of transportation as we create all these exciting events to come to san francisco. i know it's exciting for board president david chiu, we tried to put pods for car sharing in neighborhoods on public streets
keep a city or any government frasa:@r protectinge health of their people. we cannot regulate the health of our people because of a federal regulation. that's ridiculous. in fact, the federal regulation is much, much more narrow than that. the second thing is the at&t argument that the issue that they're worried about is tissue warming. it's a very typical thing in industry for the industry to throw out a kind of red herring that throws you off track. the one thing we know about microwaves from experience is it does not generally warm things. the effect on the body is much more precise than that. and it really is out of respect that this body did the right thing tonight that i'm bringing that to your attention tonight. >> president chiu: are there any other speakers? please step up. >> good evening, supervisors. what a night. i feel relieved but not in any way jubilant. i wanted to give you some comment about public comment. i've stood in these chambers a number of times and watched certain supervisors chastise members of the public for how they've given their public comment a
mean more people voting for city attorney and treasurer and if that's not democracy, i don't know what is. there's a reason why this is getting such broad support and i think it deserves the voters' support. >> thank you. and dr. faulkner, would you please summarize why you believe people should be voting against this measure? >> originally it was all odd year elections for city government. the main focus was to have a lot of elections spread out so people would pay attention. that was the idea of the 1932 charter. it is good in the sense given the history of san francisco and, frankly, a lot of governmental problems we had historically, getting people to pay attention to city government has been very important. we had 1901 to 1907 a group called roof ring, they described the 18 supervisors then on the board as, quote, so corrupt they would eat the paint off the walls. that's the reason why we want people to pay attention to their city government. frankly, new england city governments are the small ones and tall hall government is the best of all. we can't do that. but we
. this project needs to be resolved. otherwise, the benefit to the city and a personal view and not approving this project is you probably have a building that sits vacant for many more years. if the person who has the building now can't afford to invest the money and create two units they won't find -- unless someone is independently wealthy. would rather have this family or have a vacant? we are not in a situation where we can do this. unfortunately that is the case here. >> commissioners, motion on the floor as to approve the project as proposed by the project sponsor. on that motion. (voting) motion passes, 5-2, commissioners moore and wu voting against. >> general public comment? i would like to close the meeting in memory of a gentleman named frank -- property owner at fisherman's wharf, our neighbor next door for the wax museum for three generations. his father and my grandfather spent lunches together, father spent a lot of time with frankie. with that the meeting is adjourned. here to introduce the mayor of san francisco, forecast sf sponsor and regional vice president health syste
if it turns out the way that most elevated parks and cities around the world have turned out. so i just want to flag it as an area that i think will need continued focus from this group. >> thank you, director. that is always a good point to make. and i do want to mention and certainly bob can follow up on this. in addition to have a connection from the transit tower to the park and we are going to have a connection of other developments to the park. there will be direct connections from the towers and surrounding high-rises to the park. we are also working very closely with our team on putting out at some point soon, a concept of operations rfp that will be looking at both the facility, as well as the park level. and how to best operate it, and to secure it and insure that it is successful. we are looking at high line park here in new york as one of the models. that park has been successful and it does not have the level of taller connections that our park will have. and in addition to that, whereas you know we are going to be having a number of programming activities and an amp i theatre f
, and these are measures we have had to take that have caused students to suffer and have caused all of city college to suffer. so that's why we're looking for an opportunity to bring in some funding from the city that we think san francisco taxpayers will support and that the state can't take away so that we can continue to serve san franciscoans. >> understood. i know there's a relationship with proposition 30 as well, of course, from the tax base and it's all connected and --. >> that's right. >> the tax is $79 per household. can you talk about that and how that would be an impact in your view? it's an 8-year tax. it's a finite tax. >> well, you know they say the only things permanent are death and taxes. once a new tax is implemented we often find even though it's called temporary when it gets passed, it ends up bking permanent or longer term than was discussed. i would love for my colleague here to tell us that she won't support extending that tax beyond the 8 years if it were to pass, but i believe that there's other ways that city college can stay afloat and continue to serve a declini
's been a collaborative effort in the city as well. i want to next introduce mohammed nuru director of public works who was instrumental in helping us launch this project. (applause) >> thank you. i'll keep it brief. i just want to say thank you to the department of public health for being a great partner with dpw. we've had a good opportunity to be able to renovate many of our health centers. we are building the new hospital and today this very, very great project. the project from dpw, we provided architectural design. we provided engineering and construction management. and i'd like to thank the team that worked on the project real quick, the project's architect, lamont and banito, please give them a hand. (applause) >> from the engineering james ing and ray louie, give them a hand. (applause) >> and for construction administration jose gordato. (applause) >> and, of course, from the public health side, mark primo from dpw, [speaker not understood] who both led these projects. a little quick note about the project itself, the building is over 100 years old. and while all this wor
for generations here in the city. we need to provide jobs. with when we talk about green jobs of future and sustainable produce, we need to talk about how to feed the single mothers in those communities. we need comprehensive reforms to bring those disadvantaged communitis with us. we cannot provide those folks with jobs unless we reform our drug policies in san francisco, which essentially disadvantage and persecute young men of color who on a day to day basis are being subjected to the criminal justice system in a way that is not done by other members of our society. >> you have got another minute. [ laughter ] >> on a day to day basis what we're doing here in san francisco is we are disenfranchising folks and limiting their ability for future employment. once you have a conviction for a non-violent drug-related crime, your chances of getting a future employment are essentially nil. there was a research study published recently in a san francisco newspaper, that showed the rate of drug convictions dropped, and the violent crime here in san francisco did not rise. essentially what w
city. i had them for over 40 years. they're gone but with that said i started two successful businesses in san francisco. i have a childrens' foundation "one children at a time inc." and did jobs around the world and every nickel i raised go to helping the kids. i will bring a strong budget control initiative to san francisco and i will show it by opening my district office in either on ocean avenue, lake side, and out of the money they give i will take a part of that fund and pay for that office in san francisco, but i will open it in the district so i will serve the people. bob squirey. i appreciate your support. >> thank you. mr. rogers. >> i am glen rogers and a native son of san francisco. i went to school here wanting to do public service and i went to sonoma state and majored in sociology and when i graduated i joined the peace corps in afghanistan. after returning i saw some lovely places and i wanted to be a landscape architect. i went to colpolly pomona and encouraged me to get involved in politics. i have been working on projects like civic centers, parks, f
quad droople the number of solar roofs we created 28 companies and created 450 jobs in the city and making san francisco the solar capitol of california. when people were losing their homes here in san francisco in call, there is plenty of talk and discussion about what to do, we commissioned the first report of its kind to make sure that there were facts behind the dialogue, and because of those facts that came out in our report, looking at foreclosures, finding fraud and finding inappropriate activities that happened by the lenders, action was taken and the home owner's bill of rights and i was proud to be one of the co-sponsors of the piece of legislation in the state. when people talk about fixing education, i first and foremost have that personal experience going into the public schools and going to uc berkeley and seeing my daughter attend a kindergarten every day. and i can tell you that there is no more important issue in our state than education and what we are doing. we need to make sure that it is a priority and it is getting funded and we can't continue to fund highe
the toughest issues facing the city. welcome, supervisor. thank you for joining us. let's start by talking about your background -- where you grew up, what kinds of jobs you have work. supervisor chu: my parents immigrated to the united states about 30 years ago, and i would say that is probably the most formative part of my background. growing up in an immigrant family, you learn many things. my parents raised me in southern california, and i grew up in the restaurant business. they had a small restaurant at the time, and i was there every weekend, working -- well, not working, eating. having a fried egg roll, wanton, something good. it taught me the value of working hard and what it meant to be part of a small business, a small business -- a small business, small family, and an immigrant family at that. really being impacted by the los angeles riots, when that occurred, put me on the path toward public policy and understanding what it meant to have opportunities and not have opportunities in our various communities. >> why did you choose to live in san francisco? supervisor chu: i came t
new york is the most densely populated city in the u.s. and over 40 million tourists visit the city every year. the 1.3 billion gallons of water required every day are delivered by a system of extraordinary scale and complex engineering. man: water is essential to the economic viability of new york city. reliable infrastructure and reliable delivery of water is a must. you have to reinvest in the infrastructure every single minute to keep it current. hurwitz: we have the stock exchange, we have the united nations -- failure can have a dramatic impact on the nation, and even internationally. so there's a really keen awareness that you always have to be fixing the system. things corrode, they rust. they get to where you turn them on and nothing happens. but it is so totally used in every nook and cranny, that making any accommodation to shut it down, to do something to it, is very difficult. narrator: two massive underground tunnels, called simply tunnel 1 and tunnel 2, provide most of the city's water supply. they run hundreds of feet below manhattan, far deeper than the subways. bui
this city an even better place to start and grow a new business, and second, he's been a toothless support of electric vehicles to improve san francisco's environment and the global environment as a whole so please welcome mayor ed lee. >> michael, matt, congratulations to scoot, yes. scoot and san francisco, well, let me first of all put this in some little perspective that i know, i know that we just announced last week, eb week in san francisco to the delight of so many people who want to just have modes of transportation, multiple modes of transportation in a city that are also environmentally friendly and to contribute that reducing our fossil fuels, we are in san francisco world citizens after all and i know it's exciting for ed risken, our mta manager, he and i were excited to talk about different modes of transportation as we create all these exciting events to come to san francisco. i know it's exciting for board president david chiu, we tried to put pods for car sharing in neighborhoods on public streets and began in russian hill on his district, he's a vibrant, vibrant avid supp
of women voters. along with the league and sf gov tv, i'm here to discuss proposition c the city currently uses federal, state and local funds to support affordable housing programs for both low income and moderate income households. recent federal cutbacks and reductions in state funding have decreased the funding available for affordable housing programs. proposition c would amend the charter to establish a housing trust fund. the city would contribute $20 million dollars to the fund in 2013. each year the city contribution would increase by 2.8 million dollars up to 50.8 million dollars in 2024. after 2024, the city would contribute an annual amount base the on the 50.8 million dollars but adjusted for changes in the city's general fund revenue. the city would use the fund to build, purchase and improve affordable housing, provide 15 million dollars for a loan program for down payment assistance for moderate income home buyers and emergency first responders and provide up to 15 million dollars for a program that would help eligible households avoid foreclosure. proposition c would ch
and sf gof tv, i'm here to discuss proposition e the city requires businesses it pay a flat 1.5 percent tax on payroll cost for work performed in the city. small businesses with less than 250,000 dollars in payroll costs are exempt from the tax. proposition e would create a new city business tax based on gross receipts rather than payroll costs. under the new system, the tax on payroll cost would be eliminated or reduced. businesses with gross receipts of less than 1 million dollars annually will be exempt from the gross receipts tax. the gross receipts tax rate would vary depending on the type of business and its annual gross receipts from its activity in the city. certain businesses that have their headquarters or administrative offices in san francisco that operate primarily in other locations would pay the gross receipts tax based on payroll costs. proposition e would require the city to phase in the gross receipts tax and phase out the tax on payroll costs over a 5 year period beginning in 2014. if the gross receipts tax revenue exceeds the revenue the city would have received
compliance is up. the violence is down. a variety of entertainment is what makes our city great. we will touch on the upcoming party legislation -- party bus legislation and a safe place for our youth to go. after our panel discussion will have some regard groups so we can share ideas and brainstorm. we have a very luminary panel here. right now, i would like to introduce our cheap -- chief of police. [applause] >> good afternoon. i also am not john newlin, and i have less hair than him. [laughter] is a pleasure to be here for the second year. there are fewer people here. that might be because it has been a good year. as audrey suggests i believe that is because of partnership is up. we want to be a police department that you are comfortable calling before anything happens with out fear of having us say, no, we are going to shut it down. we want to work with you to make it happen, but it means as safely as possible. certainly, alcohol always played a role as well as the age of the patrons, and on and on. again, please give us a chance to further develop the trust that we have been b
up when i leave the city. i had them for over 40 years. they're gone but with that said i started two successful businesses in san francisco. i have a childrens' foundation "one children at a time inc." and did jobs around the world and every nickel i raised go to helping the kids. i will bring a strong budget control initiative to san francisco and i will show it by opening my district office in either on ocean avenue, lake side, and out of the money they give i will take a part of that fund and pay for that office in san francisco, but i will open it in the district so i will serve the people. bob squirey. i appreciate your support. >> thank you. mr. rogers. >> i am glen rogers and a native son of san francisco. i went to school here wanting to do public service and i went to sonoma state and majored in sociology and when i graduated i joined the peace corps in afghanistan. after returning i saw some lovely places and i wanted to be a landscape architect. i went to colpolly pomona and encouraged me to get involved in politics. i have been working on projects like civic ce
is what makes our city great. we will touch on the upcoming party legislation -- party bus legislation and a safe place for our youth to go. after our panel discussion will have some regard groups so we can share ideas and brainstorm. we have a very luminary panel here. right now, i would like to introduce our cheap -- chief of police. [applause] >> good afternoon. i also am not john newlin, and i have less hair than him. [laughter] is a pleasure to be here for the second year. there are fewer people here. that might be because it has been a good year. as audrey suggests i believe that is because of partnership is up. we want to be a police department that you are comfortable calling before anything happens with out fear of having us say, no, we are going to shut it down. we want to work with you to make it happen, but it means as safely as possible. certainly, alcohol always played a role as well as the age of the patrons, and on and on. again, please give us a chance to further develop the trust that we have been building over the last several years. some of the questions that they a
helen diller. together with the clean and safe neighborhood parks fund and the city's general fund. >> 4. 3. 2. 1. [applause] >> the playground is broken into three general areas. one for the preschool set, another for older children, and a sand area designed for kids of all ages. unlike the old playground, the new one is accessible to people with disabilities. this brand-new playground has several unique and exciting features. two slides, including one 45- foot super slide with an elevation change of nearly 30 feet. climbing ropes and walls, including one made of granite. 88 suspension bridge. recycling, traditional swing, plus a therapeutics win for children with disabilities, and even a sand garden with chines and drums. >> it is a visionary $3.5 million world class playground in the heart of san francisco. this is just really a big, community win and a celebration for us all. >> to learn more about the helen diller playground in dolores park, go to sfrecpark.org. >> welcome to city hall. thank you for joining us. thank you for coming out. i want to thank members of the board of super
cut. to get our -- check out our blog. i will have >> welcome to city hall. thank you for joining us. thank you for coming out. i want to thank members of the board of supervisors. i want to thank them for being here in this joint recognition of our commissioners and members of 14 different bodies that will be appointed today to committees and commissions. i want to thank all the friends and family for joining us. let me say how excited i am this past week, i have been watching a certain convention. next week, we will have an even more exciting convention to watch. it is of course, in the spirit of the expected national, regional, and state elections we are preparing for. it is also a reminder of the importance of our civic duty and all the different departments we have created. public engagement is extremely important to the way we run government in san francisco. it has always been about public engagement. we need the last bodies come a different viewpoints, different economic classics -- classes, ethnicities, and regions of the city to be well-represented on everything we do becau
all utility companies subscribe to as well as the city so basically they have a data base when they get called when their operators get calls 1-800-227-2600. they send a dispatch to 8385 brady. if you have utilities in the area mark them. >> here's the best part its free to the users. the utilities don't want you breaking their gas line. before you dig call usa and get your utilities marked. >> each utility has their own color. >> [inaudible]. >> water department has not been out here to mark it. >> okay we will continue to walk up here. i'm not sure where we will stop. >> one of the big issues we see all over the city are garages where there is a slope down into the garage. here is one of those slopes is this an encroachment ask how do we improve. >> this is an encroachment. >> old building. >> old building and old encroachment. this probably was never approved. >> what is the current standard for allowing to slope the sidewalk. >> current standards we have historic buildings in san francisco and we are getting requests for essentially putting in a garage a basement
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